Iran press tv

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About Press TV Owned by IRIB Launch July 2, 2007 Language English Country Iran Slogan News anew Broadcast area Worldwide Headquarters Tehran, Iran Sister channels Al-Alam News Network HispanTV Website www. IRIB's head is appointed directly by the , , and is considered to be close to the country's.


iran press tv
Retrieved 29 December 2009. Archived from on 1 April 2015. In November 2012, the -based took Iranian channels off air in East Asia, and in October 2012 and stopped broadcasting several Met satellite channels, though the managed to resume broadcasts after striking deals with smaller companies that are iran press tv in other countries. He alleged that a Press TV 10 second interview and 'confession' had been preceded by torture, and was given under the threat of execution. Retrieved 26 November 2014. IRIB is sincere-owned but independent of the in its management and is the only legal TV and radio broadcaster inside Iran. Retrieved 10 April 2012.

Each episode shows hardships imposed on different individuals who have different stories. Retrieved 30 April 2018.


iran press tv

Press TV LIVE - Archived from on 18 June 2012. The New York Times.


iran press tv

Press TV stylised as PRESSTV is a 24-hour English- and French-language news and documentary network affiliated with IRIB. IRIB is state-owned but independent of the in its management and is the only legal TV and radio broadcaster inside Iran. IRIB's head is appointed directly by the , , and is considered to be close to the country's. Press TV is headquartered in and has offices and bureaus around the world, including , , , and the. We want to show that there is a different view. Iran, and the in particular, have become a focal point of world propaganda. From the media point of view, we are trying to give a second eye to Western audiences. Test satellite transmissions were conducted in late April 2007. The channel launched on 3 July 2007. On 18 March 2009, Press TV launched a new website with a modified. Press TV upgraded to 16:9 format on 17 November 2011, being the first Iranian network to upgrade its feed to this format, and the second international news network based in the Middle East to do so, after. PressTV shooting at , Press TV offers round-the-clock news bulletins every half-hour, a series of repeating commentary programmes and round-table panel discussions, as well as documentary-style political films. Official satellite footprint maps and satellite enthusiast-maintained transponder change notifications are also available and may at times be necessary to consult. Main article: In 2012, the ADL issued a report alleging that Press TV has been broadcasting what the ADL says are examples of conspiracy theories and opinions. The very fact that Press TV is Iranian-owned makes it the ideal English-language platform on which to do so. Removal from Western and Asian satellites On April 3, 2012, Munich-based media regulator BLM , announced it was removing Press TV from the , as it did not have a licence to broadcast in Europe. However, the channel's legal team submitted documents to the court that proved Press TV could broadcast under German law. Munich's Administrative Court announced on Friday 15 June that the ban was illegal. As of September 2012 the channel became unavailable on Astra 19. In November 2012, the -based took Iranian channels off air in East Asia, and in October 2012 and stopped broadcasting several Iranian satellite channels, though the managed to resume broadcasts after striking deals with smaller companies that are based in other countries. In July 2013 Press TV and other Iranian channels were removed from several European and American satellites amongst others those of Eutelsat and Intelsat , allegedly because of the Iran sanctions, even though an EU spokesperson told the channel that these sanctions do not apply to media. Maziar Bahari and UK licence revocation In June 2010, , the British broadcaster, transmitted a programme featuring , a documentary maker and contributor, who was arrested while covering the , and held in custody for 118 days. He alleged that a Press TV 10 second interview and 'confession' had been preceded by torture, and was given under the threat of execution. Bahari, now a British resident, complained to , the regulatory authority for the telecommunication industries in the United Kingdom. In May 2011, Ofcom ruled that Press TV was responsible for a serious breach of UK broadcasting rules by airing the 10 second interview with Maziar Bahari, accepting that it had been obtained under duress while he was held in a Tehran jail. A fine of £100,000 was eventually imposed in November 2011, reversing an initial decision to revoke Press TV's licence. The investigation into the Bahari case had revealed the applying company's direct connection to Tehran, and that editorial control came from there. An invitation to change this in the licence had not been taken up by Press TV. The unpaid fine was not the reason why Ofcom ended Press TV's licence. Defenders of Press TV, including Alderman and the broadcaster's legal representative, Farooq Bajwa, have referred to a formerly secret American diplomatic cable dated 4 February 2010. This 'exploration' was in response to the jamming by the Iranian government of broadcasts by the BBC Persian Service and the , also mentioned in the document and mentioned by Alderman. Press TV began its activities in London during 2007. Roshan Muhammed Salih was Press TV's London news editor and chief correspondent. He hosted Epilogue, a monthly book review programme, and Comment on occasion. The show takes a look at world economies: the power of major banks, the stock markets, and its effect on democracy, and the distribution of wealth around the world. It was formerly produced by Joobin Zarvan and Amir Tajik. The format is that there are 3 files per episode. Presented by Reza Nayebi. Presented by Roshan Mohammed Salih. The program was produced and hosted by Susan Modaress. The show examined current cinematic releases, and explored the underlying political and social issues that shaped them. The format allows a studio audience to ask the presenter questions or argue with him. This Program pursued the life of Palestinian refugees who are now residing in Britain. Each episode shows hardships imposed on different individuals who have different stories. This Program was talking all about politics. Broadcast from the heart of. The show covered critical news stories from across the globe. The show was presented by Shahb Mossavat and Joobin Zarvan. The show was presented by Amir Arfa. It is also aired on weekends, from Beirut by and and. The show focuses on controversial issues where the presenter asks the questions around the theme and the audience express their views. The show scrutinizes the status of women in the West and deals with their common issues, challenges and upheavals. The show was presented by Amir Arfa and Joobin Zarvan. Retrieved 19 March 2018. Retrieved 30 April 2018. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Archived from on 19 March 2012. Archived from on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Archived from on 20 December 2007. Retrieved 27 June 2007. Archived from on 1 April 2012. Retrieved 27 June 2007. Archived from PDF on 1 August 2014. Retrieved 21 December 2013. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Retrieved 7 December 2011. Retrieved 29 December 2009. IRIB is independent of the Iranian government and its head is appointed directly by the supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. It is the only legal TV and radio broadcaster inside the country but millions of Iranians watch foreign-based channels via illegal satellite dishes on rooftops. World news The Guardian. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Retrieved 6 August 2007. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Archived from on 21 January 2009. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Retrieved 13 November 2013. Retrieved 15 April 2012. Archived from on 8 April 2012. Retrieved 10 April 2012. Archived from on 18 June 2012. Retrieved 16 June 2012. Archived from on 7 August 2013. Retrieved 25 May 2011. Archived from on 13 December 2008. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Archived from on 19 November 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2014. Archived from on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 19 November 2014. Archived from on 23 November 2014. Retrieved 23 November 2014. Archived from on 7 December 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2014. Archived from on 16 November 2014. Retrieved 26 November 2014. Archived from on 25 November 2014. Retrieved 24 November 2014. Archived from on 27 November 2014. Retrieved 26 November 2014. Archived from on 4 March 2011. Archived from on 1 April 2015. Retrieved 29 March 2015. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Retrieved 29 December 2009. Retrieved 29 December 2009. The New York Times. Retrieved 22 May 2010. Archived from on 26 January 2010.